Emergencies

 

Emergency Care

Emergency: extension 7236 or (510) 466-7236

In case of emergency at College of Alameda involving:

  • Illness
  • Injury
  • Behavior Problems (classroom disruptions and/or danger to self or others)

Call extension 7236 or (510) 466-7236 Peralta Police Services.  If necessary, the Police will contact COA Health Services.

Give dispatcher:

  • Describe situation.
  • Location of incident and person/s involved.  In a dangerous situation, be prepared to describe the individuals.
  • Are there weapons involved?  Is a car involved?  Be prepared to describe the car and report the license number.
  • Your name, telephone number and location.

Stay on the line until the dispatcher has all necessary information.

Stay on the scene to provide information when rescuers arrive.

Contact COA Administrator-On-Duty (510) 748-2311.

Other telephone numbers:

Peralta Police (non-emergency): (510) 465-3514
Alameda City Police Department (emegency number): (510) 522-2423
Alameda City Police Department (non-emergency number): (510) 377-8340

 

Safety in an Emergency

  • Survey the scene for safety (e.g. Are there fallen electrical lines?).
  • Evaluate the injury.  Is the person conscious?  Are they breathing? Do they have a pulse?
  • Do not move the person or allow her or him to get up and walk around.
  • If safety requires that you move the person, always consider the possibility of spinal cord injury.
  • Do not give fluids to an unconscious or partially conscious person.
  • Help the person maintain body temperature by covering with blankets, newspaper or clothing.
  • Look for any emergency medical identification (card, bracelet, or necklace)
    which may explain the person’s condition.
  • Loosen constricting clothing with care.

NOTE: When you provide first aid assistance, you must document the incident with an “Incident Report” form, available from Health Services or the Business Office.

Information About Ambulance Service

 

If an ambulance is needed, the ill or injured person, if able, should participate in the decision.   An ambulance will transport to the closest available acute care medical facility.  You may dial 911 or 1-888-650-5472.

KAISER HEALTH PLAN MEMBER: Kaiser must authorize the ambulance service and will transport to the nearest Kaiser Hospital.  Phone Number: Dial 1-800-390-3510

Responsibility for Medical Expenses

STUDENT INJURIES: The student is responsible for his/her medical and any ambulance expenses (exception: Intercollegiate Athletics).

FEES FOR EMERGENCY CARE: The ill/injured person will be charged an ambulance fee and the emergency hospital fee.  When the college assumes the liability for an injury, the ambulance expense will be covered by the college.

EMPLOYEE INJURIES (During working hours): These expenses are covered by Southern California Risk Management Associates, Inc.  Please check with your Supervisor regarding this.

REPORTING OF ACCIDENTS: All injuries other than those which are superficial or minor should be reported to district SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT, and/or HEALTH SERVICES, and/or ADMINISTRATOR IN CHARGE.

Defined: Life Threatening Emergencies

The following are signs and symptoms of life-threatening emergencies:

  • Respiratory distress or cessation of breathing
  • Severe chest pains
  • Shock
  • Uncontrolled bleeding
  • Choking
  • Poisoning
  • Prolonged unconsciousness
  • Overdose
  • Severe Burns
  • Any complaint or observation which indicates head or spinal cord injury

If the person is not breathing…

  • Get someone to call 911 and the Sheriff’s Department immediately!
  • The first four minutes are critical!
  • Start rescue breathing until responders arrive.
  • See  “Suspected Heart Attack and/or Stoppage of Breathing” In this manual.
  • Administer Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation if necessary and if trained to do so.

First Aid for Specific Medical Conditions

 

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained below.

Information regarding who to call and what to do in various emergency situations is posted in all classrooms.  Emergency first aid for some medical emergencies is listed on this website (use back button to return to the index).

Animal Bites

 

Animal bites are treated as puncture wounds but
should be reported to the County Wide Services,
Sheriff’s Department, Animal Control for follow up.

(510-667-7763 or 925-803-7047).

Burns – Cuts – Nosebleeds – Puncture Wounds

 

Burns

 

Immediately immerse burned area in cold water for 15 minutes
as long as there is no open skin and/or blisters.For severe burns with open skin and/or blisters, cover with a sterile gauze dressing and do not open blisters.Chemical Burns: Brush away powder; flush immediately with large quantities of water for 15—20 minutes.

Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

Cuts

Clean superficial cuts with soap and water and apply band-aid.

Deep cuts should be treated as follows:

  • Apply pressure over wound with clean cloth or sterile gauze.
  • Apply additional dressing and bandage snugly if bleeding through.
  • Elevate the injured area, if possible, and do not remove the dressing.
  • Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

Nosebleeds

  • Keep person quiet and sitting upright.
  • Assist the person to pinch nostrils and maintain pressure until the bleeding stops.
  • Cold compresses may be applied to the face or nose after the bleeding has stopped.
  • Instruct the person to avoid nose blowing for at least one hour.

If bleeding is severe and/or lasts longer than 10 minutes, refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

Puncture wounds

 

  • May be caused by pointed objects such as nails, pins or splinters
  • Allow the wound to bleed freely.
  • Wash with soap and water.
  • Apply sterile gauze dressing.
  • Tetanus booster may be needed.
  • If object is still imbedded, do not remove it.

Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Choking

 

If the victim can cough, speak, or breathe… do not interfere.

If the victim cannot cough, speak, or breathe: Have someone Call 911 AND Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456.

For a conscious victim

 

  • Grasp your fist with your other hand and press it into the victim’s abdomen
    between the rib cage and the waist with a quick inward and upward thrust.
  • Repeat 6-10 times, if needed.
  • Repeat until effective or victim becomes unconscious.

For an unconscious victim

  • Use head tilt/chin lift to open airway.
  • Try to ventilate (at least twice).
  • Give 6-10 abdominal thrusts. (Put the heel of one hand on the victim’s abdomen between the rib cage and waist.  With your shoulders directly over the victim’s abdomen, press inward and upward with quick thrusts.)
  • Look for obstruction.
  • Repeat steps until effective.
  • Continue rescue breathing or CPR, as indicated.

Everyone should learn how to perform the above steps for choking and how to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

CAUTION:

Abdominal thrusts may cause injury. Do not practice on people. Do not give abdominal thrusts to a pregnant woman.

 

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above. 

Diabetic Emergencies

 

Diabetes can produce two kinds of emergencies:

  • One from too much insulin (insulin shock), and
  • One from lack of insulin (diabetic coma).

Either emergency may cause unconsciousness!

Insulin Reaction (Shock) Signs/Symptoms

  • Weakness
  • Moist, pale skin
  • Intense hunger
  • Drowsiness
  • Normal or shallow respiration
  • Irritability
  • Headache
  • Blood sugar is too low

The patient needs sugar immediately!  The patient needs medical attention!

Treatment for Insulin Reaction:

  • If conscious, give sugar and call Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456.
  • If unconscious, do not give anything by mouth.  Call (from campus phone) 9-911 and   Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456

Diabetic Coma Signs/Symptoms

  • Extremely ill appearance
  • Dry, flushed skin
  • Weak, rapid pulse
  • Deep, noisy breathing
  • Excessive thirst
  • Dull and sleepy
  • Acetone odor to breath
  • Blood sugar is too high

The patient needs medical attention!  Get medical attention immediately!

Treatment for Diabetic Coma:

Call 911 and Sheriff’s Department Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above. 

Eye Injuries

 

Foreign Body in Eye

  • Keep the person from rubbing their eye.
  • Have the person blink and try to make tears. The object may be loosened and swept away by the tears.
  • Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

Penetrating Lacerations / Wounds to Eye

  • Do not attempt to treat or to remove the penetrating object if present.
  • Have the person lie quietly with both eyes lightly covered with a small paper cup or like object.
  • Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

 

Chemical Exposure to Eye

  • Immediately flush the eye with generous amounts of cool water.
  • Assist the person to continue to irrigate the eye while you call Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).
  • It is best to pour water gently into the inner corner of the injured eye
    with the head tilted to the side, allowing the water to pass over the eyeball.
  • Irrigate the eye for at least 15 minutes unless directed otherwise.
  • If Health Services is not available, call Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456.

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Fainting – Unconsciousness – Head Injuries

 

Fainting

  • Lay the person flat or have him/her sit in a chair with the head lower than the knees.
  • Loosen constrictive clothing.
  • Keep the person warm and try to determine if any injury has occurred from falling.
  • A person who has fainted should not be sent away without further evaluation and assistance, even though they may appear to have responded completely.
  • Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

Unconsciousness

  • Keep the person flat and maintain an open airway.
  • Check for breathing and pulse. Administer artificial respiration or CPR as needed.
  • Do not move or leave the person unattended.
  • Send or call for assistance.
  • If unconsciousness is prolonged and assistance is not available, call 911  and  Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456.

Major Head Injury

  • Call 911  and   Sheriff’s Department, Ext.7236 or (510) 465-3456.
  • If unconsciousness, convulsions, or the discharge of blood or fluid from the ears occurs, do not move the person.
  • If the person has a severe headache, nausea or vomiting, incoherence or a dazed appearance, do not move the person and do not give fluid.

Minor Blows to the Head

  • Allow the person to rest and apply ice to the affected area.
  • Observe the person for symptoms as above.
  • Caution against over activity.
  • Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Fractures – Dislocations – Sprains

 

Suspect a possible fracture if the following symptoms are present:

  • Differences in shape and length of corresponding bones.
  • Obvious deformities, crookedness or rotation.
  • Swelling and pain.
  • Loss of sensation.

Have someone call Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456.

  • Do not move the injured part.
  • Support the injured part, using cardboard, newspaper or magazines for splints.
  • In cases of major joint injury (knee, hip, shoulder, ankle) or suspected back or neck injury, do not move the person.
  • Elevate the injured part and apply ice if possible.

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Heart Attack and/or Stoppage of Breathing

 

SUSPECTED HEART ATTACK

 

Early warning signs and symptoms of a heart attack:

  • Chest discomfort/chest pain which may affect left arm, shoulder or jaw.
  • pale bluish discoloration of skin, lips and fingernails.
  • Sweating.
  • Difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, nausea, weakness or anxiety.

First aid until help arrives

  • Have someone call 911 AND Sheriff’s Department Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456 immediately.
  • If conscious, help individual to the least painful position, usually sitting with legs up, bent at the knees.
  • Loosen constrictive clothing around neck and midriff.
  • Check for breathing and begin rescue breathing if necessary.
  • Check for pulse; begin CPR if necessary.
  • Do not allow victim to assist in moving himself or herself.

CESSATION OF BREATHING

When a person cannot breathe on his/her own, due to electric shock, drowning,
or asphyxiation, the first four minutes are critical!

Have someone call 911 AND Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456 immediately.

  • Open airway
  • Tilt head back with one hand.
  • Place fingertips of other hand under chin to lift jaw.
  • Listen for breathing for 5 seconds.

If not breathing

  • Maintain open airway with head tilted back.
  • Pinch off nostrils.
  • Seal your mouth around victim’s mouth.
  • Give one full breath every 5 seconds. (Every 4 seconds for children,
    every 3 seconds for infants.)
  • Check pulse after first two breaths. If no pulse, perform CPR if trained (2 breaths/15 compressions).

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Insect Sting

 

Remove stinger if possible without squeezing venom sack. An object like a credit card can be used to “flick” the stinger away.  If stinger can be seen and not removed, refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

  • Apply cold compresses to site.
  • Observe the person and/or accompany to Health Services for evaluation.

If hives (red welts on skin away from the site of the bite), rapid swelling about the eyes and mouth or difficulty in breathing occurs…

  • Have someone call 911 AND Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510)465-3456 immediately!
  • Administer rescue breathing if needed.
  • Keep the affected part down, below the level of the victim’s heart.
  • Ask the person if he/she has medication for allergic reactions and assist them to self-administer, if necessary.

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Poisoning

 

Possible symptoms

  • Vomiting and heavy, labored breathing.
  • Deep sleep from which the person cannot be aroused.
  • Eye pupils are very small or very large.
  • Strong smell to breath, like gasoline.
  • Burns around the mouth.

Response

  • Have someone call 911 AND Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456.
  • Do not give fluids to an unconscious person.
  • Identify the poison if possible.
  • Call San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Center (800) 876-4766 and follow their instructions.
  • Do NOT induce vomiting unless instructed to do so by Poison Center.

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above.

Seizures

 

 

  • Lay the person flat, face turned to one side to keep the airway clear and prevent choking.
  • Do not restrain person’s movement.  Loosen restrictive clothing.
  • Remove chairs, desks or other nearby hazards that the person may hit.
  • Protect head from injury.
  • Do not place any objects between his/her teeth.
  • Provide privacy during the seizure.  Ask bystanders to leave the scene.
  • Do not try to revive him/her with fluids, stimulants, fresh air or walking.
    There is nothing you can do to hasten recovery.
  • Do not use artificial respiration unless breathing is absent after muscle jerks subside, or unless water has been inhaled.
  • Do not panic. Usually the seizure will subside, and the person will recover.
  • Check for Medic-Alert bracelet or necklace or card.

Evaluate whether you need outside help

There is no need to call an ambulance if:

  • If medical I.D. jewelry or card says “epilepsy” and
  • If the seizure ends in under five minutes, and
  • If consciousness returns without further incident, and
  • If there are no signs of injury, physical distress, or pregnancy.

Call 911 AND  Sheriff’s Department, Ext. 7236 or (510) 465-3456 for any of the following:

  • If the seizure has happened in water.
  • If there is no medical I.D. and no way of knowing whether the seizure is caused by epilepsy.
  • If the person is pregnant, injured, or diabetic.
  • If the seizure continues for more than five minutes.
  • If a second seizure starts shortly after the first has ended.
  • If consciousness does not start to return after the shaking has stopped.
  • If an injury occurs during the seizure.

If the ambulance arrives after consciousness has returned, the person should be asked whether the seizure was associated with epilepsy and whether emergency room care is wanted.

SPECIAL THANKS to Santa Rosa Junior College for their courteous permission to use some of the information contained above. 

After a seizure, the person may be drowsy, slow to respond and require observation.  Refer to Health Services for assessment and further instructions (ext. 2320).

 

Universal Precautions

From: The OSHA Handbook Methods of Compliance

Universal Precautions are implemented when administering first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation or any procedure where the potential for exposure to blood or any body fluid is present.  Body fluids include saliva, sweat, vomitus, tears, intestinal and urinary tract materials.

Universal Precautions are implemented by hospitals, clinics and institutions, and are recommended by the American College Health Association in the administration of first aid in college health services and first aid stations.

Universal Precautions assumes that all persons are considered potentially infected with a transferable disease.

I.  Procedures for all employees which may involve contact with blood and/or other body fluids.

A. Injuries
1.  Minor injuries. Allow the injured person to administer their own first aid and dispose of all waste material in a plastic lined container or toilet. Provide the injured person with necessary materials for cleansing and covering the injured    area. Direct the injured person to wash their hands following self-care.  Avoid direct contact with the body fluid.
2.  Major injuries. Immediately notify the Police or the College Nurse. (Each carries disposable gloves to be worn when  handling body fluids.) Calm the injured person and stay with him/her until the police or nurse arrive.   In the event of direct   exposure, immediately wash your hands and/or the other body areas thoroughly with soap and water. Contact the College Nurse with any further concerns regarding risk of exposure.
B. Contaminated Surfaces
1.  Disposable gloves should be worn whenever cleaning surfaces contaminated by body fluids.
2.  Surfaces must be disinfected with a disinfecting agent.  Household bleach diluted 1:10 is sufficient. Other   disinfecting agents may be obtained from the nearest First Aid box, custodial services, Sheriff’s Department or the College Nurse.
C. Contaminated Materials
1.  Disposable gloves should be worn whenever handling any contaminated materials.
2.  Dispose of contaminated gloves in plastic lined waste baskets after all possibility of contact with body fluids is eliminated.  Do NOT touch outer surfaces of the gloves when removing them.
 D. Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after removing gloves.
All materials should be disposed of in a plastic lined waste basket, or in case of small articles or fluids, in the toilet.
In the event of personal exposure to body fluids directly, or through contaminated surfaces or materials, wash any exposed area thoroughly with soap and water.   Contact the College Nurse for any concerns regarding this exposure.

            
II.  Procedures for Police and College Nurse

A. Wear disposable gloves whenever in contact with blood or body fluids.
B. Handle exposed surfaces, materials and gloves following steps outlined in paragraph I, B and C above.
C. Use the oral-nasal barrier when administering cardio-pulmonary resuscitation.

From: The OSHA Handbook Methods of Compliance

THE BASIC RULES OF UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS

The purpose of Universal Precautions is to prevent or minimize exposure to blood borne pathogens.

  • Approach ALL patients as if they are HIV or HBV infectious.
  • Universal Precautions apply to tissues, blood, and other body fluids containing visible blood.
  • Approach ALL blood, body fluids, and tissues as if they are HIV or HBV contaminated.
  • Approach ALL needles and sharps as if they have been contaminated with HIV or HBV.
  • Blood is the single most important source of HIV, HBV, and other blood borne pathogens in the workplace.
  • Universal Precautions also apply to tissues, semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, and amniotic fluid.
  • Universal Precautions do not apply to feces, nasal secretions, breast milk, sputum, sweat, tears, urine and vomit unless they contain visible blood. Precautions do not apply to saliva, except in dentistry.
  • Anticipate the kind of patient contact and use appropriate personal protective equipment.
  • Know the limitations of the personal protective equipment you are using, when the equipment can protect you and when it cannot.
    • Do not recap needles.
    • Do not break or otherwise manipulate needles.
    • Place contaminated sharps in puncture-resistant containers.
    • Wash hands immediately after contamination or removing gloves.

Universal Precautions do not eliminate the need for other category-specific or disease-specific isolation precautions, such as enteric precautions for infectious diarrhea.

 

College Policies

 

GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

 

The “Emergency Care Procedures” flipchart, as adopted by the Peralta Board of Trustees, is to be followed in all cases of accident and/or illness. See the “Emergency Care Procedures” flipchart for recommended first aid procedures.

 

College employees may not give any medical treatment beyond first aid treatment for any injury or sudden illness. No medications, including oral medications (aspirin, etc.), shall be administered.

 

Student or visitor accident reports must be filed with the Sheriff’s Department office for all except minor/superficial injuries. The accident report may be given to Health Services, Sheriff’s Department, or the Administrator in Charge. Accidents involving college employees during working hours should be reported promptly to the first level manager or supervisor.

 

Portable oxygen tanks are located in Sheriffs Department vehicles.

FIRST AID KITS

 

First aid kits are located in areas of high accident risk (labs, shops, etc.). For a specific listing of the areas, please contact the Business Office. First aid kit refill supplies are provided by an outside vendor.

Disaster Response Instructions

 

 

Your students will be looking to you for advice and directions in the event of a college disaster. Your responsibility is to provide for the safety of your students. YOU NEED TO BE READY.  Below are some procedures designed to assist you.  Each incident will be given greater attention during our ongoing Safety Meetings.

NOTE: After an emergency, faculty are required to account for the students in their class.

EARTHQUAKES
  • Give the “DUCK, COVER AND HOLD” command when the quake begins.
  • After the quake, render first aid where needed.
  • Do not move a seriously injured person.
  • Evacuate others to safety area.
FIRE
  • Listen for Fire Alarm Signal.
  • Evacuate to safety area.
  • Await further instructions.
  • Render first aid where needed.
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
  • Evacuate the area.
  • Render first aid where needed.
  • Cordon off the area.
  • Notify Sheriffs Department at 7236.
ELECTRICAL POWER FAILURE
  • Turn off all switches.
  • Await further instructions.
EXPLOSION & FALLEN AIRCRAFT
  • Give the “DUCK, COVER AND HOLD” command.
  • Render first aid where needed.
  • Evacuate if clear presence of nearby life threatening condition does not exist.
  • Await further instructions.
AIR POLLUTION
  • Close all doors and windows.
  • Reduce physical activity.
  • Await further instructions.
SEVERE WEATHER
  • Do not evacuate unless life-threatening condition does not exist.
  • Await further instructions.
CIVIL DISTURBANCE
  • If disturbance is outside the building: do not investigate, notify Sheriff’s Department at 7236.
  • If disturbance is inside the building: notify Sheriff’s Department at 7236.
  • Await further instructions.

EVACUATION: MOVE AWAY FROM THE BUILDINGS, CLEAR THE INNER COURTYARDS.  DO NOT RETURN TO THE CLASSROOMS UNTIL THE SIGNAL IS GIVEN TO DO SO.

(Please contact your Division Dean for a copy of the Evacuation Map.)

Revised August 1997